Russian Propaganda

The biggest mistake one can make upon exiting the B at the last stop, inhaling undertow-flavored air and narrowly passing a man in a fake Gucci shirt and a rabbit hat hawking caviar from a foldable outdoor table, is to assume that you’re seeing a passable facsimile of Russia. Brighton Beach is far more interesting. What you’re actually getting is a kind of double-blind guess— a Jewish immigrant’s idea of what an American’s idea of Russia may be. And that’s what makes it arguably the most fascinating ethnic enclave in New York: It looks just as exotic to the ethnicity it enclaves.

 

The biggest mistake one can make upon exiting the B at the last stop, inhaling undertow-flavored air and narrowly passing a man in a fake Gucci shirt and a rabbit hat hawking caviar from a foldable outdoor table, is to assume that you’re seeing a passable facsimile of Russia. Brighton Beach is far more interesting. What you’re actually getting is a kind of double-blind guess— a Jewish immigrant’s idea of what an American’s idea of Russia may be. And that’s what makes it arguably the most fascinating ethnic enclave in New York: It looks just as exotic to the ethnicity it enclaves.

 

Beijing’s Yabalou neighborhood’s Russian flea markets cater to the Russian traders from Siberia.  Previously local Chinese people called the traders “da daoye” (big trader), while as of 2011 they now refer to them as “hao pengyou” (“good friend”). In addition to Russian traders, Polish, Ukrainian, former Yugoslav, and other eastern European traders also do business in Yabaolu. Many restaurant owners and shop keepers do business in Yabaolu. Some pedicab drivers speak pidgin Russian and charge the equivalent of two U.S. dollars for a ride. Like many ethnic enclaves, it has its own unique culture imported by its residents. The focal point of the district are several large clothing markets. Business signs are mostly inRussian and written in Cyrillic, a surprise to many tourists. 

Dmitry Markov

Dmitry Markov. 2007-2008.

Cosmonautics Day
On April 12, 1961, a 27-year-old Russian cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, the son of a carpenter and a milkmaid, completed an orbit around the Earth aboard the Vostok spacecraft.  Humanity, for the first time, had journeyed into outer space.  And so it was proclaimed космос для Pусских!

Cosmonautics Day

On April 12, 1961, a 27-year-old Russian cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, the son of a carpenter and a milkmaid, completed an orbit around the Earth aboard the Vostok spacecraft.  Humanity, for the first time, had journeyed into outer space.  And so it was proclaimed космос для Pусских!

This series of photographs was taken in a textile factory in the town of Ivanovo, some 275 km north-east of Moscow. The town was called the ‘city of brides’ because the population counted a majority of women working in the textile factories.

Already the centre of the textile industry in Russia during the time of the Czars, there were once approximately 30 different plants where all kinds of fabrics were manufactured, mostly from cotton and linen.

In the course of time, mostly due to competition from countries where the cost of labour is low, such as China, they almost all had to close down. At present only a handful of them are still active, but none are expected to last long anymore. 

The factory where I made my series was a very big plant, where every step of the process of fabric production was performed, but now it has narrowed its activities to only bleaching and printing.

My intention was to make a portrait of the factory by combining its interiors, the fabrics that are produced and the women doing the work. The fabrics portrayed come from different collections, produced over the years, old and new. The same applies to the images of interiors, where old and newer equipment is shown, and the workers, who are women of different ages.

Lucia Ganieva

Daria Tuminas.

Kirovograd Penal Colony #6

The Keach-Gorodetsky District of the Vologda oblast by Olga Ivanova. 

Tatu

—Lybov v Kazhdom Mgnoveni